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DES Home > EMQ Home > Community Safety and Sustainability > Floods

Flood

Table of Contents

  1. What is a Flood?
    1. Flash flooding
    2. Mountain or coastal rivers quick onset flooding
    3. Inland rivers slow onset flooding
  2. What can you do to prepare for a Flood?
  3. How will you be advised of a Flood?.
  4. What should you do when a Flood warning is issued?
  5. What to do if you need to evacuate?.
    1. When evacuation is imminent
    2. When you have been told to evacuate.
  6. What to do during a flood?
    1. General advice on what to do during a flood
    2. What to do during a flood in your house
    3. Travelling in flood conditions
    4. What to do during a flood at an Evacuation Centre
  7. What to do after a flood?
  8. Further Information and Reading


What is a Flood?

There are three different types of flood that can occur in Queensland.

Flash flooding is the most dangerous in terms of potential threat to loss of life and can result from relatively short, intense bursts of rainfall that can occur almost anywhere in Queensland. People are often swept away after they enter these floodwaters on foot, or in vehicles, due to the speed and power of the swift moving water. There may be little or no advance warning for flash flood so it is important to:

Mountain or coastal rivers quick onset flooding occurs in the mountain headwater areas of large rivers, as well as in rivers that drain to the coast. In these areas, the rivers are steeper and flow more quickly, with flooding lasting for one or two days. These floods can pose a risk to loss of live and property as there is much less time to prepare and the flow of water is faster and more dangerous.

Inland rivers slow onset flooding is the flooding of rivers in the vast flat areas of central and western Queensland that may last for one or more weeks and can lead to -

The Bureau of Meteorology uses the following flood terms. It is important to know what they mean.

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What can you do to prepare for a Flood?

If your area is flood-prone, you should:

To help prepare and assist your community in preparing for and responding to floods – consider joining the State Emergency Service or register with Volunteering Qld.

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How will you be advised of a Flood?

The Bureau of Meteorology provides:

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What should you do when a Flood warning is issued?

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What to do if you need to evacuate?

When evacuation is imminent -

For non-emergency communications, use text messaging, e-mail, or social media instead of making voice calls on your mobile phone to avoid tying up voice networks. Data-based services like texts and emails are less likely to experience network congestion. You can also use social media to post your status to let family and friends know you are okay

When you have been told to evacuate

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What to do during a flood?

There could be a number of scenarios that you could find yourself in during a flood.

General advice on what to do during a flood.

What to do during a flood in your house

Travelling in flood conditions

What to do during a flood at an Evacuation Centre

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What to do after a flood?

Use the telephone for emergency calls only - Use social media, e-mail and text messaging to contact one another during disasters as these are less likely to experience network congestion

You can also use social media to post your status to let family and friends know you are okay.

Conserve your mobile phone battery by reducing the brightness of your screen, placing your phone in airplane mode, and closing apps you are not using that draw power.

If you lose power, you can charge your mobile phone in your car. Just be sure your car is in a well-ventilated place (remove it from the garage) and do not go to your car until any danger has passed. You can also listen to your car radio for important news alerts

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Further Information and Reading

Australian Red Cross: Resources web page that includes a number of REDIplan information booklets.

Emergency Management in Australia: Community awareness publications

Emergency Management Queensland: Publications for Preparedness

Queensland Government flood information: Information on financial assistance - payments, grants and loans

Queensland Government (Qld Health): Disaster Management

Lifeline: Services and information for people experiencing a personal or community crisis

Australian Government (Attorney Generals Department): What to do Before, During & After a Flood.

Australian Government (Bureau of Meteorology)Flood Forecasting and Warning Services

Queensland Government (Department of Justice and Attorney-General): Electrical safety in storms and floods

Building Services Authority: Natural Disaster BSA’s Tips for Rebuilding & BSA Disaster Recovery and Rebuilding Advice


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Last updated 18 December 2011